Articles by Jerry Coleby-Williams

Leucospis wasp drinking nectar from goldenrod

Into the wild

September 2013

Gardeners can become fixated on maximising productive space, but having a wild patch in the garden can bring many benefits, from pollination to pest control, writes JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS.

Chinese celery

Beneficial insect-attracting plants

July 2013

In the Sept-Oct issue of Organic Gardener magazine, in Natural Solutions, we referred to a full list of beneficial insect-attracting plants grown by JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS at his home, ‘Bellis’ in Brisbane. Here they are!

 

The sustainable block

April 2013

After 11 years in Sydney, Jerry Coleby-Williams and Jeff Poole decided to realise their passions for gardening and living sustainably.

Mushroom compost and pests

March 2013

In the May/June issue of Organic Gardener magazine, JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS digs into the mysterious world of fungi and how to grow your own.

NICK ROMANOWSKI and Jerry offer some additional information about making mushroom compost, and some of the pests and diseases that can affect these fungi.

Garden expert Peter Cundall builds a leafmould mound.

Gardener’s Gold

May 2012

JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS explains how to turn autumn leaves into a rich garden resource – leafmould.

A predatory hoverfly attracted to coriander flowers.

Flower Power

December 2011

As the caterpillar breeding season begins in earnest, fight them with flowers, writes
JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS.

Super sunflowers

December 2009

As a child I used various seed mixes for feeding my pet budgerigar, mice and gerbils. Curious to see what sort of plants these blends contained, one Easter holiday I sowed some of each. When the summer school holidays started in my London backyard I had my first crops of chilli, millet, sorghum and sunflowers. Those first sunflowers really caught my eye, just as they did with Francisco Pizarro, a Spanish conquistador, who recorded seeing them being cropped in 16th century Peru.

Rounding up the volunteers

December 2009

By encouraging 'volunteer' crops in your garden, you can keep weeds at bay and ensure a year-round supply of fresh food, writes JERRY COLEBY-WILLIAMS.

Nematodes - nasty and nice

December 2009

It was a dawn operation. Everyone slept as I removed my spent tomato plants. I didn't shake soil from their roots as normal. Instead I carefully gathered the lot, sealed them in a plastic bag, and quietly slipped it into the garbage bin. For a fortnight my tomato leaves had been thinning and yellowing. On sunny days they wilted despite the soil being moist. When I lifted them, their roots had rubbery, tumour-like growths. My tomatoes had root knot nematode. The plants cropped well, because I routinely foliar feed with seaweed, so nutrients entered mainly through their foliage and stems, not their roots.