Plants & Vegetables

Chaffed to Bits

January 26, 2013

In the March/April 2013 issue of Organic Gardener magazine, reader Cynthia Titmarsh told of her experiment, with husband Richard, to grow a backyard wheat crop.

Cynthia’s letter came in response to two articles in late 2011 by Nick Romanowski on growing backyard grain crops. We have held off publishing her letter until now - wheat-planting time. To set the scene, here are these two articles, from the September/October 2011 and November/December 2011 issues of Organic Gardener magazine.

More Rare Fruits

January 26, 2013

Growing your own rare and unusual fruit provides luscious rewards and helps conserve endangered varieties.

In the March/April 2013 issue of Organic Gardener Magazine, Justin Russell simply ran out of room to profile the many rare fruit available for cultivating in Australian gardens. Here he describes a few more.

Cucumber Trellis

Arc de Cucumis

January 25, 2013

JUSTIN RUSSELL takes a leaf out of Phil Dudman's book and grows his cucumbers on a reinforcing mesh trellis.

Learn to scythe... and more

January 25, 2013

Scything, soil and sauerkraut are on the menu at an upcoming workshop weekend, SIMON WEBSTER reports.

Sowing Carrots

Putting Down Roots

January 17, 2013

The best time to sow winter veg is now, in mid-summer. JUSTIN RUSSELL shares his tips for sowing carrots and parsnips.

Too hot? Grow microgreens

January 16, 2013

If it’s getting too hot for growing your favourite leafy greens and herbs in the garden, then try growing your own organic microgreens in pots, writes PHIL DUDMAN

Summer Apples

Apples for Christmas

December 21, 2012

JUSTIN RUSSELL picks his first apples of the season, and offers a cheery Christmas recipe using the fruit.

Shelter from the storm

December 7, 2012

JUSTIN RUSSELL reflects on the latest round of climate talks at Doha, and the implications of dangerous global warming for gardeners.

Apricots

Apricot Season

November 30, 2012

Early summer is stonefruit season in many parts of Australia, and JUSTIN RUSSELL eagerly anticipates a bumper crop of apricots.

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